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Amateur Radio Field Day June 25-26

Amateur Radio operators provide a critical public service to communities during times of disaster.

They are able to provide reliable communications when the normal infrastructure is offline.

They are licensed by the Federal Communication Commission and trained in the art and science of radio communication and basic electronics theory.

Operators own and maintain their own communication equipment and are prohibited from receiving payment for services.

Field Day is their chance to show the science, service, and skill they offer to communities free of charge.

On June 25-26, members of the Jim Bell Wireless Association will participate in the Amateur Radio Field Day Exercise at 2828 Sand Cut Road (Old Time Farm Day location).

The event is open to the public and all are encouraged to attend.

For more than 100 years, Amateur Radio – also called “ham” radio has allowed people from all walks of life to experiment with electronics and communication techniques.

In times of emergency, they provide critical services when phone lines and other communications lines are interrupted.

Field Day demonstrates ham radios ability to work reliably under any conditions from almost any location and create and independent communications network.

According to David Isgur, communications manager for the American Radio Relay League, “If there’s an interruption of service or you’re out of range of a cell tower, you have no way to communicate.

“Ham radio functions completely independent of the internet or cell phone infrastructure, can interface with tablets or smart phones, and can be set up almost anywhere in minutes.

“Hams can literally throw a wire in a tree for an antenna, connect it to a battery powered transmitter and communicate halfway around the world.

Anyone may become a licensed Amateur Radio operator. There are more than 725,000 licensed hams in the United States, as young as nine and as old as 100.

For more information about Field Day or Amateur Radio, call 334-399-5386, visit www. arrri.org, or email fieldday@krtns.com.

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